ARRHYTHMIA

Various types of arrhythmias exist depending on what part of the heart
is affected and how they originate. The causes of arrhythmia also vary
but can generally be divided into two categories: malfunctions in the
electrical impulses that cause the heart muscle to beat; or physical
problems with the heart, such as atherosclerosis, damage from a heart
attack, or congenital heart defects. Lifestyle may also play a role in
the development of arrhythmia.
Once the cardiac ablation is complete, the catheters and IV lines are removed. No stitches are required since only very small incisions were made. You are transported to the recovery unit for a while then on to his or her hospital room for a few hours of observation. You may have some soreness where the IVs were removed and where the catheters were inserted as well as some bruising. Depending on where the cardiac ablation was inside the heart, they may also have some minor soreness in the chest – but not chest pain or shortness of breath.Most patients go home within a day of the cardiac ablation procedure. Before you leave the hospital, your electrophysiologist will talk to you about medications, activity, and follow-up care. When it’s time to leave, make sure a friend or family member is there to drive you home.
Catheter ablation is an invasive procedure used to remove a faulty electrical pathway from the hearts of those who are prone to developing cardiac arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, supraventricular tachycardias (SVT) and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.The catheters are then advanced towards the heart and high-frequency electrical impulses are used to induce the arrhythmia, and then ablate (destroy) the abnormal tissue that is causing it. Catheter ablation is usually performed by an electrophysiologist (a specially trained cardiologist) in a cath lab.
Please note that this section includes a dedicated page on atrial fibrillation, one of the most common cardiac arrhythmias, affecting more than 15 million people worldwide. Untreated cardiac arrhythmias are a potentially serious medical condition. If left untreated, they can be the cause of serious heart problems and even lead to death. Early detection and treatment are crucial in preventing more serious health problems. It has also been observed that the magnesium level in the right atrial tissue is lower in adult patients with postoperative cardiac arrhythmias compared to patients without arrhythmias after heart surgery.
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only way to stay there is to expand successfully on all fronts. Building on its groundbreaking research, CryoCath has grown to become a well-funded, market-driven corporation. Already successful in major European and Rest-of-World (ROW) markets, CryoCath is extending its leadership to the United States through growing sales of SurgiFrost™ and Freezor® products. CryoCath established its pre-eminence in catheter-based CryoTherapy products for the electrophysiology ablation market with its first commercial product, Freezor®. CryoCath now serves a second major worldwide customer base, cardiac surgeons, with its unique SurgiFrost™ Surgical CryoAblation System for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. CryoCath continues to focus on expanding the distribution and use of both product families to existing and new key markets throughout the world.
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a disorder of the heart characterized by
rapid and chaotic beating of the atria and is the most prevalent
cardiac arrhythmia, affecting four million patients in the Western
World. AF is one of the leading causes of stroke and short-term
hospitalizations with 400,000 new cases annually. Despite its
prevalence, there are no current, practical clinical options to
effectively and safely treat AF. Catheter ablation to resolve AF’s
underlying cause, aberrant electrical signals originating on the left
side of the heart near or within the pulmonary veins, has been
restricted by safety concerns. As a result, the standard treatments for
AF are limited to various costly drug regimens that offer only a
palliative (non-curative) approach.
Various types of arrhythmias exist depending on what part of the heart
is affected and how they originate. The causes of arrhythmia also vary
but can generally be divided into two categories: malfunctions in the
electrical impulses that cause the heart muscle to beat; or physical
problems with the heart, such as atherosclerosis, damage from a heart
attack, or congenital heart defects. Lifestyle may also play a role in
the development of arrhythmia.
MAX Cooling Power, Deeper Lesions - Designed for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias, including atrial flutter, Freezor® MAX is a powerful ablation-only catheter. This 9 French catheter with an 8mm ablation tip was designed to provide maximum cryo performance. It is connected to the same cryoconsole as the other cryocatheters, but its larger shaft
and ablation tip allow for optional heat removal. As a result, Freezor® MAX creates deeper and larger lesions to treat a variety of arrhythmias.
Safety and practicality are important features associated with cryotherapy in the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. cryotherapy offers electrophysiologists the ability to test potential ablation sites accurately by inducing a reversible electrical and thermal effect. CryoTherapy procedures also offer increased site precision through CryoAdhesion. It produces well-demarcated cryolesions that heal quickly. Tissue immediately adjacent to a cryolesion demonstrates normal electrical activation. There is also a reduced risk of perforation with cryotherapy. Pre-clinical studies have demonstrated minimal endothelial disruption and thrombus.
To diagnose a heart arrhythmia, your doctor may ask about your arrhythmia. Often the first approach selected for the treatment of heart arrhythmias is the use of anti-arrhythmic medication. These may include digitalis, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, anticoagulants, and other drugs. In many cases, medications to treat arrhythmias have to be taken for life. Medications are carefully selected because they may cause side effects. In some cases, drugs may provoke heart arrhythmias or make them worse. As a result, physicians will weigh the benefits of the drug against the risks of taking it. Your doctor will prescribe the dose or type of your medication suitable for treating your heart arrhythmia.
Without any treatment, atrial fibrillation can occur as a problem by itself – that is, unrelated to any other heart condition or disease. In such cases, it can be treated with medication or with catheter ablation by a cardiac electrophysiologist or with a surgical procedure by a cardiac surgeon. Atrial fibrillation is also associated with chronic fatigue and heart failure – where the heart is unable to pump enough blood to the other organs. Fortunately, these risks can be reduced dramatically if they are monitored and treated. By working closely together, patients and doctors can choose the most appropriate course of care for the atrial fibrillation treatment.