Eastern Townships

Escape the big-city hustle and bustle for a cozy romantic getaway in
the Eastern Townships! Enjoy a haven of peace and comfort at our inns
and bed and breakfasts; our spas offer a full range of care to
alleviate even the most severe stress.

Put down your bags and relax - you've finally arrived in our neck of
the woods, a corner of the country we proudly call the Eastern
Townships. Take time to explore a unique and subtle mix of Anglo-Saxon
and Québécois charm against the beautiful backdrop of Quebec's most
southern region.
Named for the Appalachee nation, which lived in the north of Florida,
the Appalachian mountains run the length of North America's east coast,
more than 3,000 kilometres from the state of Alabama to the tip of
Newfoundland. The Eastern Townships occupy a northern central part of
the chain, stretching up from the Green Mountains of Vermont and the
White Mountains of New Hampshire. Cut, polished and shorn by glaciers,
the Apalechen platform appeared more than 400 million years ago, and is
now enhanced by large lakes, such as Memphremagog Lake, that often
reach into the States. As a mountainous region, it benefits from
microclimates that create impressive ecological diversity. The bedrock
is rich in minerals such as copper, zinc, and asbestos, as well as
high-quality roofing slate and granite.

The Montagnarde offers visitors a cycling trail of over 50 km. This
allows you to experience the beauty of the Memphremagog region,
renowned for its wealth of lakes and mountains. You’ll pass the shores
of Memphremagog lake and through magnificent forests, while viewing the
magnificent countryside of the Parc national du Mont-Orford. The
Montagnarde is accessible from many points. Services for cyclists are
provided along its length. A map detailing the Montagnarde is available
from the regional tourist office, as well as from tourist information
offices in the towns mentioned above. The Montagnarde is affiliated
with the Route Verte and the Trans Canada Trail.

Outdoor fun for the whole
family in the Baie-de-Magog park on Memphremagog Lake. Skating, ice
sculpture, etc.
The Montagnarde offers visitors a cycling trail of
over 50 km. This allows you to experience the beauty of the
Memphremagog region, renowned for its wealth of lakes and mountains.
The Montagnarde is accessible from many points. Services for cyclists
are provided along its length. A map detailing the Montagnarde is
available from the regional tourist bureau, as well as from tourist
information offices in the towns mentioned above. The Montagnarde is
affiliated with the Route Verte and the Cross-Canada Trail.
A
128-km bike tour around Lake Memphremagog (2 days).


Created in 1971 through the merger of seven towns (Knowlton, West
Brome, Foster, Fulford, Iron Hill, Bondville and East Hill), Lac-Brome
surrounds Brome Lake. This is a reference to a village of Suffolk
County, England. Local citizens have created a heritage circuit to
guide visitors. The largest part of the municipality, the elegant
Victorian village of Knowlton, is famous for its Loyalist heritage and
Anglo-Saxon ambience. It was established upon the arrival of Colonel
Paul Holland Knowlton, who came from Vermont and who had built a
flourmill by 1836, a sawmill and a store. Other additions - including a
grain mill, blacksmith shop and general store - quickly became
prosperous and popular, transforming Knowlton into a small upper-class
village by the end of the 19th century. In 1894, Knowlton inaugurated
the first free public library in Quebec, the Pettes Library. In 1855,
the village, a regional centre for telegraph reception, became equipped
with a post office and an inn and became the seat of Brome County
government. Since 1867, vacationers have been attracted to Knowlton -
the Canadian Handbook Tourist Guide was already describing it as far
from average. Splendid residences were built around the lake from 1920
onwards, hidden discreetly behind hedges of cedar or imposing walls of
stone. Today, the quality and the originality of its restaurants and
its gift, craft, and antique shops charm visitors. The centre of the
village is alive with a waterfall, to the great pleasure of strollers
benefiting from the quiet and greenery of Coldbrook Park. Every autumn,
a multi-restaurant gastronomical event celebrates the world-famous
Brome duck culinary art, turning the centre of the village into an immense
country-style festival. At Christmas, businesses and residences alike
blossom with fabulous decorations, granting a vision of Christmas in a
bygone era. Foster and Highwater are former railway stations, around
which some hotels and houses have sprung up. Foster Station (1862) is
the standard model of stations found along the Canadian Pacific railway
at the beginning of the 20th century, and efforts to conserve it have
been commendable. Built on the banks of the Yamaska River, the small
hamlet of Fulford emerged in 1858 with the construction of a large
tannery. In 1881, the economic activity of the village was reinforced
with a sawmill. Two Protestant churches serve the community. The
village of West Brome was also colonized very early by Loyalists. On
McCurdy Street, between Route 139 and Durkee Street, you'll see a
variety of typical clapboard houses. Also not to be missed: a wooden
chapel dating back to 1885 and a neo-classical general store. On the
other side of Route 139, a kilometre along Scott Road, is a beautiful
round barn.
Come, let yourself become intoxicated and enamored while breathing
deeply the fresh air of the Eastern Townships. Four Provincial Parks,
six regional parks, downshill skiing as well as cross-country skiing
centres and so many other Winter activities for everyone to choose
from. It's mind boggling and will give you a jump start!


Autumn in the Eastern Townships arrives in a blaze of color and
activity with Duck, wine and good cheer! From the beginning of
September to the end of October, visitors can enjoy a wide choice of
gastronomic treats, showcasing the agricultural and wine products of
this scenic region of southern Québec. By following the " Route des
Vins ", a themed wine country route, vacationers can enjoy the attractions
along the way, revelling in the glorious colors of fall. Tourisme
Cantons-de-l'Est guarantees that vacationers will have a terrific time
this fall - not least because the region is staging more than 40 lively
events, each one more colorful than the next. Visitors can slow down to
the relaxed rhythm of the locals and discover the many charming
villages scattered around the picturesque countryside.

The specially designated Wine Route offers visits to 12 vineyards,
mainly in the Dunham region. Each site in wine country features cultural activities to enrich your discovery of the vineyard, with antique shops and treasures also scattered along the route. Get to know the Townships by visiting our museums and historic sites, and enjoy the hundred-odd seasonal festivals that take place in our picturesque towns.
Situated on the shores of Lake
Memphremagog, 15 minutes from the Vermont border, Owl's Head offers
excellent skiing and surfing on 36 well groomed trails, which provide
breath-taking views of the surrounding Appalachian countryside. The
Owl's Head Auberge and the Apartment/Hotel provide our guests with
ski-in/ski-out, slopeside accommodation, ranging from comfortable hotel
rooms to 1-, 2- and 3-bedroom condo style units ideal for family
vacations. The combination of "ski-in ski-out" accommodation at the
Owl's Head Auberge, delicious meals and superb skiing equals a
wonderful vacation !

Escape the big-city hustle and bustle for a cozy romantic getaway in
the Eastern Townships! Enjoy a haven of peace and comfort at our inns
and bed and breakfasts; our spas offer a full range of care to
alleviate even the most severe stress.

Put down your bags and relax - you've finally arrived in our neck of
the woods, a corner of the country we proudly call the Eastern
Townships. Take time to explore a unique and subtle mix of Anglo-Saxon
and Québécois charm against the beautiful backdrop of Quebec's most
southern region.
Lodging in Southern Quebec... A vacation prepared for you and by you!
Warm welcomes, courtesy, variety and above all, a quality Experience
par excellence. Our region offers a vast array of hotel establishments
that can fulfil your needs and your personal tastes. Drop your
luggage, kick off your shoes, sit back and allow yourself to be charmed
by the true warmth of our cosy corner of Quebec. New England Charm
with a Quebec Flair!

Ski Orford Provincial Park welcomes its visitors to old-growth forests.
Whether for walking, cycling, camping or skiing, you'll have a great time
discovering this all-natural recreational destination!

You‚ll pass by the banks of Lake
Memphremagog and through magnificent forests, also viewing the
countryside of Ski Mount Orford Park.
High vertical drops, 3
mountains, 4 faces, 52 panoramic runs and glades. Located in the
Magog-Orford area, just one hour from Montreal and 30 min. from the
border, close to autoroute 10. Orford ranks among Québec's top four
resorts, with its outstanding vertical drop (1,772 feet) and 230 acres
of skiing terrain.
In 1792, the Canadian government, member of the British Empire, decreed the founding of this new region, the Eastern Townships. The government compensated loyal subjects by giving land grants according to a township system, with each township having roughly 10 miles per side
(259 square km). Colonization was thus modeled after traditional
British townships as opposed to the French 'Seigneurie' model used in
the St. Lawrence Valley since 1534. The Loyalists therefore gave their
villages British names: Sherbrooke, Dunham, Granby and North Hatley, for
example.
Deauville, now known as the Borough of Vallons-du-Lac, joined the new
City of Sherbrooke on January 1, 2002. Deauville was, for many years, a
rest stop. Its original name, Scaswaninepus, was an excellent
description of Little Magog Lake's vocation as a place to rest by the
waterside. Although the British American Land Company (the owner of at
least 75% of the land around the lake) kept this land uninhabited for a
long time, the beauty of the site and its proximity to Sherbrooke
attracted the class of citizenry that aspired to summer home ownership.
Dr. Prosper Olivier was the first of many to build his log fishing
cabin in 1893. To maintain the peaceful nature of this community, local
residents soon began opposing the construction of industries,
businesses, restaurants, garages and service stations in their town.
Those who had a place on the 'Little Lake' were the crème de la
crème... both Francophones and Anglophones. From liberal professions,
their names included the likes of Ernest Sylvestre, Albert-Carlos
Skinner, Ludger Forest and Charles Benjamin Howard, who all became
mayor of Sherbrooke at one time or another. It's impossible to consider
Deauville's history without paying homage to the classic hotels that
first brought ifame - the Lake Park (1901), Manoir du Lac (1921), White
House Pavilion (1932), Auberge des Pins (1947) and the Beau Site (1947)
all had their glory days. Sadly, they were never replaced after each
succumbing to fire. Deauville was officially recognized in 1945, during
a campaign to install essential services.